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Ms. Margaret Dunlea
Assistant Professor, School of Nursing & Midwifery

Biography

Margaret Dunlea RGN, RM, B.Sc.(Honours) Anthropology, M.Sc. Midwifery Education is a lecturer in Midwifery in the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin. Having qualified as a midwife in 1986 she has extensive experience in all aspects of midwifery care, working in both hospital and community settings in the UK and Middle East and more recently in Ireland. On returning to Ireland in 1998 she worked as a midwife in the Rotunda Hospital while also completing a Masters in Midwifery Education at University College Dublin (2001-2003). She took up a post as a Midwife Tutor in The School of Midwifery in the Coombe in 2002. Her transfer to TCD in September 2006 coincided with the launching of Trinity's first honours undergraduate degree programme in midwifery (BSc in Midwifery 4 years) Margaret's research interests are in Maternity Care and she is currently completing a PhD entitled A Critical Institutional Ethnography of Antenatal maternity Care: the nature and meaning of the antenatal encounters.

Publications and Further Research Outputs

Peer-Reviewed Publications

Madga Ohaja, Jo Murphy Lawless and Margaret Dunlea, Religion and Spirituality in Pregnancy and Birth: The Views of Birth Practitioners in Southeast Nigeria , Religion , 10, (82), 2019, p1 - 10 Journal Article, 2019

Magdalena Ohaja, Jo Murphy-Lawless and Margaret Dunlea, Birth Space in Nigeria: a site of conflict,, Old Tension, Emerging Paradoxes in Health: Rights, Knowledge and Trust, ISTE Lisbon, Portuga, 6-8 June 2018, 2018 Conference Paper, 2018

Magdalena Ohaja, Jo Murphy-Lawless, Margaret Dunlea, Spiritual and Religious Aspects of Pregnancy and Birth in Nigeria , Spirituality at a Crossroads, Trinity College Dublin , 20-21 June , 2018 Conference Paper, 2018

Dunlea Margaret, Murphy-Lawless Jo, Ohaja Magda , The nature and impact of risk discourse in the provision of antenatal care: A literature review, AHRC Risks of Childbirth in Historical Perspective network, University of Leeds , 2017 Conference Paper, 2017

Dunlea Margaret, Murphy-Lawless Jo, Ohaja Magda , The nature and impact of risk discourse in the provision of antenatal care: A literature review, Risks of Childbirth in Historical Perspective (AHRC funded network), University of Leeds , 29th March 2017, 2017 Conference Paper, 2017

Magdalena Ohaja, Jo Murphy Lawless and Margaret Dunlea, Cultural safety: Construction of risk in the context of safe motherhood in Nigeria, Risk in Childbirth In Historical Perspective (AHRC Funded Network), University of Brighton , 06072017, 2017 Conference Paper, 2017

Cowman Triona and Dunlea Margaret, Perineal Repair by Midwives in Ireland: A National Survey of Skills Knowledge and Experience, Normal labour and Birth Conference, Grange over Sands in the English Lake District, 15th to 17th June, 2015 Conference Paper, 2015

Cowman Triona and Dunlea Margaret, Perineal Repair by Midwives in Ireland: A National Survey of Skills Knowledge and Experience, Normal labour and Birth Conference, Grange over Sands in the English Lake District, 15th to 17th June, 2015 Conference Paper, 2015

Cowman Triona and Dunlea Margaret, Perineal Repair by Midwives in Ireland: A National Survey of Skills Knowledge and Experience, Optimising Childbirth Across European: An Interdisciplinary Maternity Care Conference , Brussels Belgium, 9 to 10th April 2014, 2014 Conference Paper, 2014

Dunlea Margaret, Cowman Triona, Kelly Paul, Poster: A national survey identifying the perceived competence and the process of education and training in perineal repair by midwives in Ireland , School of Nursing and Midwifery Trinity College Dublin, Trinity College Dublin , 07.11.2014, 2014 Conference Paper, 2014

Dunlea Margaret, Cowman Triona, Kelly Paul, Poster: A national survey identifying the perceived competence and the process of education and training in perineal repair by midwives in Ireland , School of Nursing and Midwifery Trinity College Dublin, Trinity College Dublin , 2014 Conference Paper, 2014

Dunlea M, BRADY V, Begley C, Murphy-Lawless J. , An exploration of the meaning of the first antenatal encounter from the perspective of service user and provider. , OPTIMISE2014 Conference: Optimising Childbirth across Europe: An interdisciplinary maternity care conference., Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium, 9 &10 April 2014, 2014, pp53 - 54 Conference Paper, 2014 URL

Dunlea M, Brady V, Begley C, Murphy-lawless J, Ethnography of antenatal encounters: research ethics challenges, Trinity College Dublin Research Colloquium, School of Nursing and Midwifery TCD, 05.11.2013, 2013 Meeting Abstract, 2013

Magdalena Ohaja, Margaret Dunlea and Kathryn Muldoon, Group marking and peer assessment during a group poster presentation: The experiences and views of midwifery students, Nurse Education in Practice, 13, (5), 2013, p466 - 470 Journal Article, 2013 DOI

Margaret Dunlea, Kathryn Muldoon and Magdalena Ohaja, Midwifery student's experiences of group work when preparing and presenting a poster, AISHE International Conference: The Challenges for Graduates in a Changed World, School of Nursing, Dublin City University, Ireland, 25-26 Aug. , 2011 Meeting Abstract, 2011

Margaret Dunlea, Kathryn Muldoon, Magdalena Ohaja, An exploratory study of midwifery students' experiences of the use of poster presentation for learning and assessment, 12th Annual Interdisciplinary Research Conference, Transforming Healthcare through Research and Education, School of Nursing and Midwifery Trinity college Dublin, 9 & 10 Nov. , 2011 Meeting Abstract, 2011

Dunlea M, Do Irish midwives what autonomous midwifery practice. , Coombe Conference International Day of the Midwife, Coombe Women & Infant university hospital Dublin , May , 2005 Meeting Abstract, 2005

M. Dunlea, An Examination of the Relation of Work Empowerment and Level of Reported Autonomy in Midwifery, (RCSI) Annual International Nursing and Midwifery Conference, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland , February, 2005 Meeting Abstract, 2005

Non-Peer-Reviewed Publications

Vivienne Brady, Ashamole Clive, Deirdre Daly, Margaret Dunlea, Louise Gallagher, Patricia Hughes, Felicity Kalu, Elizabeth Newnham, Colm O'Boyle, Magdalena Ohaja, and Jeannine Webster, Readers' blog: Natural birth is not an 'elitist' philosophy, The Irish examiner, (June 8th ), 2018 Journal Article, 2018

Vivienne Brady, Ashamole Clive, Deirdre Daly, Margaret Dunlea, Louise Gallagher, Patricia Hughes, Felicity Kalu, Elizabeth Newnham, Colm O'Boyle, Magdalena Ohaja, and Jeannine Webster, 'We need maternity care providers who respect women and who listen to women', The Irish Times, (Jun 2nd ), 2018 Journal Article, 2018

Research Expertise

Description

Maternity Care, Models of Maternity Care, Introducing reform in maternity services, Autonomy and Empowerment (women and midwives), Midwifery practice, Perineum Suturing, Female Genital Mutilation/female cutting, Education, Teaching, Learning, Assessment, Group work.

Projects

  • Title
    • An examination of the relation of work empowerment and level of reported in midwifery practice.
  • Summary
    • Findings: Work Empowerment Moderate empowerment levels reported in both groups (mean 11.25, SD=2.38, range 4-20) Midwifery led group consistently scored higher-Consultant led group consistently scored lower. Findings: Formal & Informal power -Informal power rated higher than formal power (mean 3.33 and 2.7, range 1-5) -Collaboration with midwifery managers(mean 2.5) rated significantly lower than doctors (mean .6) and peers (mean 3.6)Findings: Perceived Autonomy Moderate autonomy levels reported in both groups (average mean 3 range 1-5)-Midwifery led group consistently scored higher-Consultant led group consistently scored lower -Years of experience no influence on perceived autonomy.Findings: Desired Autonomy -High desire autonomy levels reported in both groups (mean 25 range 6-30).Findings: Desired Autonomy.-Level of desired responsibility (mean 4.2)= level reported in practice (mean 4.48)-Midwives appeared to want more decision making powers (Mean 4) in comparison to level reported in practice (mean 3.42)Findings: Statistical Significance -Using independent sample t- test-Midwives in the midwifery led service reported statistically significantly higher levels of work empowerment and autonomy in practice compared to midwives in the consultant led group.Findings: Kanter's Hypothesis -Using Pearson correlation coefficient - A strong positive correlation was found between perceived work empowerment and perceived autonomy in practice in both groups
  • Funding Agency
    • self funding
  • Date From
    • Sept 2001
  • Date To
    • June 2003
  • Title
    • Member of Health Forum on Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)
  • Summary
    • This project was funded by The Office of the Minister for Integration and was carried out in collaboration with The African and Migrant Women's network in Ireland (AKiDwA.) The forum was established in response to the difficulties encountered by a growing number of women with FGM when attending The Irish Maternity Services. I played a key role in the design and publication of an information booklet for health care professionals entitled Female Genital Mutilation. This is now available on CD and has been widely distributed and well received by health care professionals. Also a representation on behalf of this group was made to the Oireactas Committee in an attempt to bring Irish legislation in line with other European countries, where FGM is illegal.
  • Funding Agency
    • The Office of the Minister for Integration
  • Date From
    • 2007
  • Date To
    • 2008
  • Title
    • "Women's Experiences of Vaginal Examinations in Labour: A methasynthesis"
  • Summary
    • 2010 - Present: The Midwifery Metasynthesis Group (MSMG) In 2010, I attended along with four midwifery colleagues a three day seminar and workshop on Metasynthesis, which was facilitated by Professor Terese Bondas from University of Nordland (Norway). Methasynthesis emerged as a response to the proliferation but relatively underutilisation of the findings of qualitative research (Sandelowski & Barossa 2007). After this seminar, we established a Midwifery Metasynthesis Group in TCD. Working in collaboration with other academic colleagues including a librarian and service user has proved invaluable. This work involved moves beyond synthesis to interpretation and the development of one explanatory theory, model or description (Paterson 2001). "Women's Experiences of Vaginal Examinations in Labour: A methasynthesis", was presented by myself and a service user at a Conference in November 2011. A paper focusing on the process and outcome of this work is currently being prepared for a peer review journal. The work of the MSMG is ongoing.
  • Funding Agency
    • self-funded
  • Date From
    • 2010
  • Date To
    • 2012
  • Title
    • 2011-2012 Group Poster Presentation Research
  • Summary
    • I led a research team who conducted a study entitled An Exploratory Study of Midwifery Students' Experience of the use of Poster Presentation for Learning and Assessment. Ethic approval was obtained and twelve individual semi-structured interviews were carried out on consenting participants. The overall finding was that poster presentation, as an alternative method of learning and assessment, although highly valued by the majority of students, was not without its difficulties. Some of the positive findings included: acquisition of skills such as communication, delegation and team working. On the other hand group marking proved problematic as it did not always reflect individual contribution and is open to misuse by 'free-riders'. Also students' experiences' of peer marking were fraught with notions of favoritism. It is intended that this study will inform future preparation of students for group work in general and poster presentation in particular. The findings have been presented at two national conferences. We are currently preparing two papers for publication in peer review journals.
  • Funding Agency
    • self
  • Date From
    • 2011
  • Date To
    • 2012
  • Title
    • 2011-2012 Perineal Repair by Midwives in Ireland: A National Survey:
  • Summary
    • My direct involvement in running Perineal Suture Workshops in the Centre of Midwifery Education in the CWIUH has been the impetus for the current proposed study entitled: Perineal Repair by Midwives in Ireland: A National Survey of Skills, Knowledge, Attitude and Experience. We have been struck by the apparent success at implementing perineal repair by midwives in some hospitals as opposed to others, where there continues to be massive resistance to the practice. Ethical approval is being sought in February and the questionnaire will be distributed to all seven maternity units in Ireland by May 2012. I hope to engage an undergraduate student to act as research assistant on this project pending successful application for Health Research Board (HRB) Scholarship.
  • Funding Agency
    • self
  • Date From
    • 2011
  • Date To
    • 2012
  • Title
    • An ethnographic study of service users' and service providers' experiences of what they consider to be the nature and impact of the shared care model of antenatal care.
  • Summary
    • Background: Antenatal care has been routine practice worldwide since the early 20th Century. Despite the evidence, the role of midwives as key care providers for low risk women in antenatal care is proving contentious. In the Midwife-led Unit (MLUs) and Domino Schemes (stands for in and out where antenatal and postnatal care is provided in the community and intranatal care is provided in the hospital) the midwife is lead care provider during the intranatal and postnatal period only. However the midwife-led models recommended for antenatal care, either caseload or group practices have been ignored in place of the traditional and what would appear to be a fundamentally flawed shared-care model, where the midwife replaces the obstetrician in caring for low-risk women alongside the GP during pregnancy. This is despite evidence that supports midwife-led antenatal care. While GPs continue to play an active role in the provision of antenatal care in Ireland, the question of whether this shared care model meets the need of the woman and is a model of best practice remains. Aim and objectives of the study: To explore service users' and service providers' experiences of what they consider to be the nature and impact of the shared care model of antenatal care. Objectives: . To explore what low-risk women, availing of the shared care model and receiving care from both GPs and midwives, consider to be the nature and impact of antenatal care as they receive it. . To explore what GPs and midwives, providing shared care for low risk women, considers to be the nature and impact of antenatal care as they provide it. . To uncover how information is communicated between different healthcare providers, both formally and informally, using shared care model. . To uncover any philosophical differences in "notions of pregnancy" that may exist through the care and advice offered during the woman-midwife or woman-GP interactions. Design: A qualitative framework using an ethnographic approach Setting: Antenatal clinics in both community (GP surgeries and Primary Care Units) and hospital settings Population and Sample: Phase 1: The study population is pregnant women attending shared antenatal care. A purposive sample of 20 women, of various parities will be invited to participate. Phase 2: The study population is midwives and GPs who have provided antenatal care using the shared-care model in Phase 1 of the study. A purposive sample of midwives and GP (10 each) will be invited to participate. The aim will be to use the same woman-midwife/GP dyad throughout the study Data collection: Recording of : . observational accounts of service users interactions with service providers . Non-structured interviews with woman, midwife and GP. . Maternity care documentation may also be reviewed. . A reflective diary . Field notes Analysis: Collection and analysis occurring simultaneously. Observational transcriptions and transcribed interviews will be analysed using thematic analysis The Vivo computer package may be used to help in data management Ethical Approval: sought and granted from relevant institutions Findings: The finding will either provide evidence to support the present shared-care model for antenatal care or the contrary, thus advancing 'true' midwife-led antenatal care provided in the community that will meet the needs of the women choosing the service. The finds will also provide insight into the nature and impact of the current system of antenatal care in Ireland (shared care) from the perspective of women, GPs, and midwives. Implications: It is anticipated that the finding will provide evidence on whether the current system of shared care meets the needs of women, GPs and midwives. In addition it is envisaged that the finding of this proposed study will inform the proposed reconfiguration of the maternity services.
  • Funding Agency
    • Stipent TCD
  • Date From
    • 2012
  • Date To
    • 2018

Keywords

MIDWIFERY; MIDWIFERY EDUCATION; MIDWIVES

Recognition

Representations

2007-2008 Member of Health Forum on Female Genital Mutilation (FGM). Involvement in Consultancy process: 2007-Review of Maternity and Gynaecology Care Services (KPMG on behalf of NHS), 2012 National Review of Undergraduate Nursing and Midwifery Degree Programmes (DHC), 2011-2012 Membership of the All Ireland Society for Higher Education (AISHE).

Awards and Honours

RCSI 24th Annual International Nursing and Midwifery Conference Greatest Potential Contribution for Nursing/Midwifery/Midwifery Practice 2005

Memberships

An Bord Altranais Legislative body for Nursing and Midwifery 1998 – 2012

An Bord Altranais/ associate member – present